Luther’s Prayer Lesson #2

Prayer is many things – quiet, still for many isn’t a great description.
 
Let’s be short here.
 
Going back to earlier this week.  There is nothing more goofy, misleading, and typically American than for us to tell one another what “normal” is in terms of something as personal as prayer.  The very idea of saying “Quiet Time” = thus and such… and "here are the elements” so demystifies the language of love between a person and his supreme love of eternity – words cannot grasp how inappropriate such a notion is, as well-intentioned all the books, articles, talks on the subject may be.
 
Be yourself.  If you are indeed quiet by nature, then be quiet.  But if you happen to be of the 49% of the world’s population that have massive testosterone streaming through your body (I.E., you are a guy!) a “Quiet” prayer routine may not be your true self.
 
Today like never in Church history we are seeing a virtual flood of books being released on how to become a person of quietness in order that one can hear God.. blah blah it goes.  One word response to that message:  “Bologna!”  In a phrase, “It is if it is…”  That’s deep philosophy folks.
 
Lesson learned – don’t let someone with a honorary doctorate who has written a book try to tell you how to get in touch with God.  You and you alone know your spiritual rhythm.  Speak, live in, flow in that distinct rhythm.  Do what it takes to be in and enjoy God’s presence – not once a day – but all day.  Live in his presence all the ever lovin’ day long.  We don’t visit God – we commune with him continually.
 
For the record, I have my own intense time with God that I am right now finding helpful.  I suspect in a year or two that approach will have changed.  Why?  Because I, like many, get bored with routines.  I move on to what I find engaging, fun, enjoyable – because my primary goal in life is to enjoy God supremely!  You too?!
 
But quiet – I am not – like many others I know.
 
More tomorrow…

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